How to buy bmx bike

how to buy bmx bike

How To Buy A BMX Bike

BMX bikes are still designed for racing, although you don't have to race to enjoy the light weight, speed and dirt worthiness of these machines. They usually have inch wheels (inch-wheel "cruisers" are the exception), knobby tires, upright handlebars with crossbars, small saddles, long . Nov 06,  · Buying Used: Many BMX race clubs, or online forums will either have a relationship with a BMX dealer or will list bikes for sale within the club, either new or used. Additionally, the BMX club can help advise what to look for when you are first starting out with solarigniters.com: Brodie Chapman.

Whether you're looking for yourself, or someone uby, answering several questions makes choosing gow right type of BMX bike much easier.

Do you want to race? Do you insist on a lightweight frame and parts? Are you going to be stalking the streets or diggin' in the dirt? Will your playground be the local skatepark, BMX track or your buddy's backyard ramps?

Thinking about these things and having a good idea about what you want and where you'll ride, will ensure you get the right BMX bike. Because people often throw around the "BMX" term generically, it's important to also understand that there are three different types of BMX bikes: the true BMX bike, the freestyle bike and the dirt jumper or just "jump" bike.

What's the difference between all these different types of BMX bikes. That's what we're here to explain. Nothing beats checking out these great bikes in person, too. After you've read this article, come into our shop and check 'em out! Knobby bbmx, lightweight frame and parts, strong rear brake.

Dirt-track racing, going fast off road for short distances. Ultra-beefy frame and wheels, pavement-ready tires, blke headset, axle pegs. Riding at skateparks, learning and performing stunts and tricks. Sturdy frame and wheels, rear brake, knobby tires.

Carving local trails, jumping ramps in your friend's back yard. They were knockoffs of motocross motorcycles and were designed for racing over jumps and around berms in the dirt. Pretty soon kids everywhere bmz them, racers or not. BMX bikes are still designed for racing, although you don't have to race to enjoy the light bioe, speed and dirt worthiness of these machines. They usually have inch wheels inch-wheel "cruisers" are the exceptionknobby how to save as bitmap, upright handlebars with crossbars, small saddles, long cranks and rear hand brakes.

The frames are light and sturdy, and the higher the price, the lighter they get. BMX bikes are generally made of mbx steel or aluminum. Chromoly frames are a bit heavier and more economical. Aluminum frames are lighter and are often made of oversize or exotically shaped tubing. Besides weighing less, aluminum is also rustproof. So, if you scratch your frame, there's no need to rush to touch it up. Hoq bikes also come in different frame sizes.

Our chart below shows the approximate fit based on rider age. Final fitting is best performed in our store. Longer top tube than Junior, mm cranks, 20 x 1. Freestyle: These entered the scene shortly after BMX bikes. Rather than racing, the freestyle bike's ideal use is for flatland tricks, aggressive street riding and getting vertical at skateparks. It's also a great bike for yo to school, the store and the pool. Super-sturdy construction is a higher priority than light weight.

The wheels are usually either "mag" wheels made of sturdy nylon far left in the photo belowor heavy-duty models with 48 wire spokes. The tires are 20 x 2. Axle pegs are often included riders stand on them for stuntsalthough some manufacturers leave them off so you can choose your own. Freestyle bikes come with front and rear brakes. The front cable is routed through a "rotor" what is consonant clusters in english "detangler," which allows the handlebars to be spun completely around without tangling the brake cable.

Dirt Jumper: As the name implies, dirt jumpers also known as jumpers are designed for taking flight. They also bridge the wide gap between BMX bikes and freestylers beefier than the former; lighter than the latter.

They usually don't have front brakes and their brawny wheels normally feature 36 rugged gauge spokes, rather than resorting to 48 spokes the way freestyle bikes do. They how to overcome fear of vomiting occasionally equipped with inch wheels, which are a great choice for larger riders.

The tires are the most heavily treaded of any of the BMX types. There are some important parts choices to make when purchasing a BMX bike:. Wheels: It's crucial that the wheels meet your needs. Because accelerating out of starting gates is important in BMX, the wheels are much lighter than those found on freestyle or jump bikes. However, that spoke light aluminum wheelset designed for BMX racing won't hold up to dirt jumping or ramping.

So, freestyle bikes what happened on april 17 1998 almost exclusively with spoke or mag wheels.

This makes them ultra-beefy for maximum rim protection. Dirt jumper's wheels tend to be bug bit more varied.

Some dirt jumpers are equipped with just 36 super-meaty gauge spokes. Others come with 48 spokes like freestyle bikes, depending on whether the bike is geared more for jumping or dirt riding.

Tires: BMX tires what is casting off in knitting the line between pavement and how to buy bmx bike designs. Although they're used mostly off road, the tracks are often hard-packed dirt where low rolling resistance is important.

The tread has to provide optimum speed and traction and grip when you're cornering and accelerating. Freestyle tires are designed for pavement and indoor surfaces.

Premium tires often inflate to higher pressures as well, lowering rolling resistance, increasing rim protection and decreasing tire deflection when the sidewalls are placed under high loads such as during landings. Dirt jumpers are usually designed for maximum traction. Since speed isn't important and the conditions aren't as controlled, their lugs are a bit beefier.

Handlebars: Beside weight and strength differences, there is also a subtle difference in handlebar shape between the BMX bar and the others. Freestyle and jump bars tend to rise steeper from the clamping area to give the rider better freedom of movement while performing flatland and airborne maneuvers.

Also, bars found on inch BMX and jumpers will be slightly shorter in rise than those found on inch bikes. Brakes: Freestyle bikes come with front and rear brakes. BMX and jump bikes usually sport only rear brakes. Brake type is also important. BMXers require pure stopping power so they prefer linear-pull brakes, which offers the ultimate grip.

Freestylers are more interested in control than grip and they prefer U-brakes front and rear. We hope this overview helps you pick out a great new bike. Browse our website to get a feel for the great BMX models we offer and be sure to visit our real store soon so we can show you some of these amazingly fun bikes up close and personal.

Happy shopping! How to make a website for dummies Racks. Gift Cards. A dirt-ready race bike. A super-sturdy stunt and gow bike.

Frames and Fork

This is the guide of how to buy a BMX bike! In this video we take you around my bike shop and show you all of our BMX bikes and we go over everything that yo.

As expected, the racing got more competitive, the demands on equipment became higher and more specialized, and subcultures naturally formed around street and freestyle BMX.

Freestyle BMX has professional riders and teams supported by huge sponsorship competing at adrenalin-fueled events such as the X-games. Feeling spoilt for choice with what BMX to buy? We are here to clear things up, spell out the differences and arm you with the knowledge to confidently purchase the right BMX bike to suit your needs. Freestyle BMX bikes are designed to withstand the stresses that come with performing stunts on street features, dirt jumps, and skate parks.

This means that the frame materials, wheels, and components must be equally optimized for both strength and ease of maneuverability. Race BMX bikes are optimized for speed and acceleration, so are often made from lighter materials and feature different geometry to ensure they are stable, stiff and nimble at speed. With the exception of flatland, there is a lot of crossover within these disciplines, so choosing an all-rounder bike that is categorized as freestyle will likely be the most versatile option.

Park: Park riding refers to riding in skate parks, which despite the name, are frequented by BMX riders almost as often as skaters.

Street: As the name would suggest, street riders get creative with urban infrastructure such as stairs and rails to perform highly skilled tricks and turns. Flatland: Quite a niche style, flatland occurs with no external features and all the tricks are done with the bike by the rider.

These riders look at getting big air and linking up jumps in to perform tricks. Race: BMX racing occurs on purpose built courses which are made from hard-packed, well-groomed dirt or bitumen and often feature a mixture of undulating terrain and long jumps.

Because BMX race bikes are designed with a sole purpose in mind, they are often unsuitable for use in other BMX riding disciplines. Freestyle and entry-level race BMX bikes are predominately made from a steel composition known as Chromoly chromo for short. Steel is the material of choice for these bikes as it is highly resistant to fatigue important considering all the hits these bikes take! For BMX racing, the preference is for stiffer, lightweight frames meaning aluminium is the material of choice.

If you are serious about your racing and want to get the extra edge, carbon fiber frames are growing in popularity amongst elite BMX racers as it reduces weight even further and has vibration dampening properties not found in aluminium. Freestyle BMX bikes are ridden by kids, teenagers and adults alike; therefore, although the wheel size stays consistent, the frame size can change subtly to suit the riding style and height of the rider.

Most freestyle BMX bikes off the shop floor will come with a 21in top tube so that riders have enough room to swing the bike underneath them if performing airborne tricks, as well as a shorter seat stay which is easier to whip around. Flatland frames are typically the only exception to this as they tend to be lighter and have shorter tubing all round for better balance and control.

On race bikes, slacker head angle and longer wheelbase put the rider further back on the bike, which allows for improved stability and handling at speed.

Race frame sizes come in a wider range to suit the rider age spread that BMX racing sees. Racing BMX bikes fall into two categories, depending on wheel size. Cruiser bikes are popular amongst taller or older riders, and also offer more stability. Because racing BMX demands lightening-quick acceleration out of starting gates, the wheels are lighter than in freestyle BMX.

The standard rim width is 32mm for freestyle bikes. For those riders who expect they will put a few more hard-hits into the wheels, can opt for a wider 36mm rim. Rims are made of aluminium and can be single, double or triple walled, the more layers of metal provide more structural support, albeit at the penalty of increased weight.

The ideal standard for a majority of riders is double wall as it is a good balance of strength and weight. Advanced riders who put more demand on their equipment will generally choose to have wheels built up aftermarket to suit their requirements specifically and be more selective with rims and spoke count.

Spoke count is another thing to consider when choosing a BMX or buying some new wheels. The number of spokes contributes to the strength as well as the weight of the complete wheel. A 36 spoke wheel will suffice for most riders on a freestyle BMX bike.

More advanced riders or heavier riders may opt for up a 48 spoke wheel. Race BMX wheels will be anywhere between a 28 to 36 spoke build and have alloy rims engineered to shave weight where possible. Being the first point of contact to the riding surface, tire choice will affect the speed rolling resistance , grip and handling of the bike. For street and park riding, smooth rolling, wider tires are preferable.

Premium BMX tires can accept pressure of up to psi, which will roll faster than a lower inflated tire and offer rim protection when under load after hard landings.

Dirt jumpers will opt for something with more tread for traction on the dirt and run their tires at a lower pressure for better grip. Wider than a race tire, look for 20in x 2. The good thing is, tires are easily swapped and changed, so you can choose to change them if you feel the need. Tyres for racing are usually narrower in suit the narrower rim profile and reduce weight, as well as roll faster on the racetrack.

The centerpiece of a wheel, BMX hubs house the bearings on which the wheels spin and are typically made from alloy. Bikes or wheelsets at lower price points will feature open-cage ball bearings, which whilst cost-effective, are susceptible to more damage and are less durable than the alternative, a sealed or cartridge bearing. Cartridge bearings have the small steel balls kept within a sealed unit, and as such are protected from becoming contaminated by dirt and debris.

Choosing a BMX bike or wheelset that features sealed bearings will mean a smoother and more reliable ride. The axle fits through the center of the hub and then slides into the dropouts in the frame to keep the wheel in place, fastened with bolts.

BMX bikes do not use quick-release systems. Cassette: Essentially the same mechanism as a mountain or road bike, the cassette hub uses an independent driver fitted onto the hub shell. Weighing less and generally easier to install and service, cassette hubs are the most popular choice for BMX bikes in both race and freestyle disciplines. Freecoaster: Freecoaster hubs divide opinions in the BMX world, and are often only selected in order to help with certain tricks and are often only used by flatland riders.

The point of difference is that freecoaster hubs have an internal clutch system that allows the rider to coast backward, so the wheel will actually drive backward without the cranks turning.

Because of their more intricate design requiring more parts, these hubs are typically more expensive and weigh a bit more than a standard cassette hub. Freewheel: These types of hubs used to be the standard, but have mostly been phased out in favor of cassette hubs. The smallest gearing available for a freewheel is tooth, which is limits gearing options for freestyle riders more about gear ratios and sprockets below.

Coaster hubs will almost never be seen on a freestyle BMX bike, with the exception of kids and entry-level bikes. You may hear the words sprocket and chainring interchanged, but to keep it clear here we will refer to the chainring as the front ring attached to the cranks, and the sprocket as the rear driver attached to the hub.

To determine the gear ratio , you will need some basic mathematics. Simply divide the number of teeth on the chainring say, 25 by the number on the sprocket nine and you will be left with 2. The lower the number, the easier to pedal, the higher, the harder it is to pedal requires more force. This means it takes little effort for the rider to accelerate quickly into a trick or a jump, but means they are compromised on top and speed and power. BMX race bikes need to allow the rider to generate explosive power, so a much larger chainring is used.

Gearing choice on a BMX race bike gets quite in depth the more progressive the riding becomes, and because there are discrepancies between wheel sizes and tire widths, it goes beyond simply gear ratio. BMX racers will be choosing and changing gear ratios to match the rhythm and demand of different race tracks, or simply to suit their physiology or ability level. When looking to purchase, it is safe to trust the gearing for race bikes will be approximately 55 gear inches, which is likely to suit the majority of riders.

One-piece cranks have the left and right crankarms and spindle all as one piece of steel. The arms thinner and are much more flimsy, only seen nowadays on kids bikes for very cheap BMX bikes. For two-piece configurations, the spindle is fixed to only one crank arm and the other is separate. These tend to be thicker and sturdier than the latter. Three-piece cranks are much stronger and have both crank arms and the spindle as three separate units Ideally, choose a BMX with a two or three-piece Chromoly crank for strength and durability.

Crank lengths can vary from mm up to mm - however most freestyle riders will opt for shorter cranks to allow for clearance when performing tricks, a common choice is mm. Race BMX crank size is dependent on rider height, and will sometimes be made of aluminium to reduce weight. The pedal of choice for all types of freestyle BMX is a wide platformed plastic pedal to reduce weight and are generally inexpensive. An added bonus is plastic is slightly less harsh than metal pedals should an inevitable blow to the shins occur.

It is important to know what size you have buying new pedals! The preference for racing is to use SPD, or clip-in pedals. These pedals provide the rider with the ability to generate maximum power for and get up to speed as the gate drops.

Of course, if you are new to BMX, a flat pedal will suffice while building confidence in handling and gate starts. Saddles do not play as much of an important role in the setup of BMX bikes, so the preference for saddles is for minimalism, even so far as to having saddles that are completely plastic. Entry level BMX bikes will have a bit more cushion and larger surface area as again the assumption is that the rider will be sitting down and pedaling more than an advanced rider who will be floating above the saddle a lot.

Rails: Just like a mountain or road bike, the has rails on either side that sit in a clamp attached to the seat post. Pivotal saddles: The saddle is connected to the seatpost vias a single bolt that goes through the middle of the saddle and into the seatpost. Not ideal for sitting on, but reduces weight significantly.

Image Jono Wade. Freestyle handlebars rise steeper than race BMX bars in order to be maneuvered better. Usually made from Chromoly or aluminium, the latter being lighter but more susceptible to fatigue, and steel will be heavier but dampen vibrations better and last longer. Bars found on inch BMX bikes might not have a crossbar and have significantly less rise to account for the higher stack due to the larger frame and bigger wheels.

Flatland handlebars usually have a very minimal sweep so the bars feel basically the same when pointed forward or backward, as well as a low crossbar so riders can swing their leg over for tricks.

BMX bikes will typically feature rim-brakes, where the pads connect to the rim to slow momentum. Freestyle bikes are equipped U-brake that sits inside the rear triangle and out of the way of the rider. Distinguishable by the division of two cables around a mechanism fitted at the headtube, the detangler allows the bars to spin a full degrees without the brake cable getting tangled.

This is incredibly helpful for advancing tricks such as barspins and tailwhips. If these sorts of tricks are not going to be on your radar, a normal brake will suffice. Although a front brake is allowed in racing, it is not necessary with most racers opting for a strong, linear-pull rear brake only, also called V-brake.

These helmets will have minimal vents and can extend to covering the ears as well. This is to take into account that BMX riders may take a stack while attempting a trick and are at risk of landing in any direction.

When racing BMX, there are rules and restrictions around equipment on the racetrack. In training and competition, a full-faced helmet must be worn along with long pants and long-sleeved jersey.

4 thoughts on “How to buy bmx bike

  1. Really very helpful and informative tutorial, Thanks for sharing with us. have look on my editing videos.

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